Monday, 23 May 2011

OURR FATHR

i feel the need to post something that i have actually done. this was a project under the brief of 'people watching'. so naturally i contrived those words as much as possible. the final outcome turned out to be a comment on the exhausted subject of religion/technology. the "concept" focused around the voyeurism and faith that, as a result of secularisation, has festered in virtual culture and the internet instead of religion. i would go further into the intentions but it was pretty thinly conceptualised. i made a sort of prayer mat which had media logos and digital brands embroidered into it as a citation of the religion within tapestry-like embroidery and there seemed something very sacrificial in the hand sewing. i also used the more industrious  machine stitching as a mark of technological comparison. the central figure was meant to represent the ravenous masses which readily consume and dispose of the media which defines them and i used some technological and religious iconography to connote the similarities and also disfigure the figure. the base of the mat is printscreened e-mails in which i had "translated" the lords prayer into a html-like, puerile, misspelt code. the other elements to the "piece" (i cant think of a less arrogant way to refer to it) were the crudely made crucifixes- the basic construction of which signified the copy and paste impatience of the technological generation- and a static television, covered in broken mirror. the tv was the only part of it i like, and it became the most polysemic part of the whole outcome as it stood as an aesthetic object but also as an idea. the dancing static of the screen behind the mirrored fragments wasnt quite captured in the photos. 






i feel a real frustration with trying to materialise an idea. my brain and my eyes dont communicate with my hands or my resources. but oh lord i'll keep trying.

3 comments:

  1. oh this is great,
    i love your blog so much

    ReplyDelete
  2. I really like this, I agree the tv is fab.

    ReplyDelete